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Abbott Offers Solution for Ships Stuck in California Ports

'In just two weeks, those same ships could go through the Panama Canal ... unload and be back in Asia before they would even be unloading in California...'

Texas‘s Republican Gov. Greg Abbott offered a Texan solution via Twitter to California’s ongoing shipping crisis, which has created nationwide supply-chain shortages.

In the video accompanying the tweet, Abbott suggested that Texas ports replace the regulation-laden California as America’s primary place of importing foreign consumer product.

According to Abbott, California has failed because of its excessive regulations, which make economic activity nearly impossible.

“The rules and regulations that exist in California—that’s one reason why you see the almost 100-day delay in ships being able to go to port and unload and get those goods across the United States of America, causing the problems that we see in the supply chain,” he said before suggesting that Texas replace California has the primary place of importation for the United States.

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“In just two weeks, those same ships could go through the Panama Canal and go to the Houston Port and Freeport Port in the state of Texas, unload and be back in Asia before they would even be unloading in California,” he added.

Abbott also cited Texas’ central location, suggesting that it is positioned well to flood the nation with foreign-made consumer goods.

“It just makes sense,” he claimed, “and why the Biden administration is not using good sense to reduce the supply chain challenge is catastrophic, it’s going to cause a spike, an increase in the cost of all these goods and make it far more difficult for Americans to get what they want for Thanksgiving, what they want for the Christmas holidays, what businesses need to be able to operate.”

According to Abbott, “going through Texas ports as opposed to California ports” will also “reduce the inflation that so many consumers are having to deal with.”

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