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Missouri Supreme Court Places McCloskeys on Probation as Lawyers

'That’s what the guns were there for and I’d do it again any time the mob approaches me... '

(Headline USA) The Missouri Supreme Court placed St. Louis couple Mark and Patricia McCloskey on probation as lawyers this week. The husband and wife gained national attention in 2020 for confronting a group of rioters outside their home with firearms.

The court initially ruled to suspend the McCloskeys’ law licenses, but then decided to delay the suspension and put them on probation for a year, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Under probation, the McCloskeys can still practice law.

“Should probation be revoked and the suspension take effect, no petition for reinstatement shall be entertained for a period of six months from the date the suspension becomes effective,” Chief Justice Paul Wilson wrote.

The McCloskeys were charged with misdemeanors after confronting the rioters outside their home. They pleaded guilty over the incident, but were later pardoned by Gov. Mike Parson

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The Missouri Chief Disciplinary Counsel Alan Pratzel then asked the Missouri Supreme Court to suspend their law licenses, arguing their behavior warranted discipline because they displayed “indifference to public safety” and “moral turpitude.”

Pratzel cited comments made by Mark McCloskey, in which he said he was unapologetic for what happened in 2020.

“The prosecutor dropped every charge except for alleging that I purposely placed other people in imminent risk of physical injury; right, and I sure as heck did,” McCloskey said.

“That’s what the guns were there for and I’d do it again any time the mob approaches me,” he said. “I’ll do what I can to place them in imminent threat of physical injury because that’s what kept them from destroying my house and my family.”

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Mark McCloskey said he is mulling whether to appeal the Missouri Supreme Court’s decision to the U.S. Supreme Court, but noted he will “respectfully cooperate with and fully perform my probation.”

“I disagree with the (Missouri) Supreme Court that what we did on our front porch constituted a misdemeanor offense involving moral turpitude,” Mark McCloskey said, according to KCUR. “I don’t think we acted in moral turpitude at all.”

Mark McCloskey is also running for U.S. Senate to replace Sen. Roy Blunt. Eight other Republicans are vying for the seat, including former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens, Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt, U.S. Rep. Vicky Hartzler, and U.S. Rep. Billy Long.

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