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Dominion Voting Systems Backs Out of Testifying Before Pa. Legislature Amid Fraud Allegations

'If they have nothing to hide, why are they hiding from us?'

Dominion Voting Systems, the company at the center of a firestorm involving widespread vote fraud in several states, drew heat after the company backed out of testifying at a committee meeting of the GOP-led Pennsylvania legislature on Thursday.

House Republicans on the State Governing Committee held a press conference in response to the last-minute cancellation saying they had authorized an audit.

Committee members “were looking forward to addressing the plethora of accusations of Dominion Voting Systems in a format which would have involved open and honest dialogue,” said state Rep. Seth Grove, the interim committee chair.

“I was impressed at what appeared to be the willingness of Dominion Voting Systems to address accusations,” Grove said. “And it would have put the 1.3 million Pennsylvanians who used their machines at ease—including myself.”

Grove continued to express his frustration with the business over its lack of accountability to its customers, as well as its apparent disregard for voting laws and procedures.

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“Thinking Dominion was willing to publicly back up their product—which Pennsylvania taxpayers invested millions to purchase and voters entrusted with their sacred ballots—was truly remarkable,” he said. “I truly felt Pennsylvanians and the nation could get some answers into the truth of the effectiveness of Dominion Voting Systems.”

But their refusal only resulted in greater suspicion, he added, calling it a slap in the face for voters in the commonwealth.

“If they have nothing to hide, why are they hiding from us?” Grove asked.

Dominion—which has links to billionaire George Soros, as well as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Sen. Dianne Feinstein and the Clinton Foundation—is one of two systems that have come under scrutiny in the wake of the Nov. 3 election.

The failures first came to light after a Michigan county acknowledged that some 6,000 votes for President Donald Trump had been switched to Democrat nominee Joe Biden.

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But further digging revealed an algorithm coded into the program may have done the same in many more GOP-heavy precincts, with 30 states having used the company’s voting machines.

Trump tweeted that more than 2 million votes may have been deleted or transferred to his opponent according to some estimations.

Some eyewitness affidavits from poll watchers have testified to seeing Dominion workers arrive in the wee hours of the night after precincts claimed to have paused their counting, and delivering what appeared to be additional ballots or else manipulating the machines to re-run the same ballots repeatedly.

Another voting-software company, Smartmatic, also has come under fire. The company, according to a previous analysis from Venezuelan officials opposed to the regime of socialist leader Hugo Chavez, is something of a “riddle.”

Although it has shuffled holding companies to make its corporate hierarchy difficult to trace, it is believed to have been founded by three Venezuelan aristocrats with ties to Chavez.

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