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Victory in 2nd Ga. Senate Race Called for Jon Ossoff

(Headline USA) At 33, Democrat Jon Ossoff is one of two candidates to help the party sweep Georgia‘s crucial U.S. Senate runoff elections, a victory that sealed Democrats’ control of the chamber.

Ossoff defeated Republican David Perdue in the runoff that was held Tuesday after neither he nor Perdue received 50% of the vote in November.

This is Ossoff’s first election to public office, and he will be the youngest member of the Senate.

In 2017, at the age of 29, he ran for Congress in Georgia in a race closely watched as an early referendum on President Donald Trump.

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Though he lost, he shattered fundraising records and made the contest in a once reliably Republican district competitive. For his Senate campaign, he took a sharper approach. His platform was unabashedly liberal, calling for a $15 minimum wage, a “public option” government health plan, and a new voting rights act to restore federal oversight of state election laws.

He also launched a fierce attack on Perdue while shrugging off his opponent’s claim that he was pursuing a “radical socialist agenda.” At a debate in October, he called the 71-year-old former corporate executive “a crook” who used the COVID-19 pandemic to protect his stock portfolio while downplaying the seriousness of the virus. Perdue insisted the allegations were false.

Ossoff is smart, has a “good heart” and will put in the work to be a good senator, said Sarah Riggs Amico, a fellow Democrat who ran for lieutenant governor in Georgia in 2018 and challenged Ossoff in the Senate primary.

“The reality is government functions better when there are people from a wide variety of backgrounds who come to the table,” she said.

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Voter Kaitlynn Poborsky, 28, said she chose Ossoff because she is looking for change and a senator who is passionate about addressing the coronavirus and climate change. She did not have concerns about his age.

“I think we need young people,” she said outside a polling site in downtown Atlanta on Tuesday. “People who are in office are too old.”

Ossoff said his first race taught him the importance of grassroots campaigning and to ignore “the paint by numbers, garden variety nonsense that the GOP throws at me.”

“I don’t pay any attention to it, and I really couldn’t care less what they say,” he told the AP last month. His campaign declined an interview request on Wednesday.

In a victory speech early Wednesday, Ossoff said he would follow the example set by civil rights leader and former Democrat Rep. John Lewis. The Georgia Democrat died last year after serving in Congress for more than three decades.

“This campaign has been about health and jobs and justice for the people of the state, for all the people of the state,” he said. “And they will be my guiding principles as I serve this state in the U.S. Senate.”

Adapted from reporting by Associated Press.

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