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Thursday, June 13, 2024

UPDATE: Ga. Judge Says Voter Integrity Group Can Inspect Fulton County’s Absentee Ballots

'We want to do this in such a way that dispels rumors and disinformation and sheds light...'

A judge in Georgia has ruled that a vote integrity group can inspect absentee ballots in Fulton County where fraud is suspected. From the Georgia Star News:

Henry County Judge Brian Amero on Monday conditionally granted members of a Georgia-based coalition the right to unseal ballots from last November’s presidential election in Fulton County.

Members of that group, VOTER GA, may now inspect those ballots for evidence of voter fraud.

Amero’s decision “is almost unprecedented in Georgia history,” said VOTER GA spokesman Garland Favorito.

ORIGINAL ARTICLE: A Georgia election-integrity watchdog may have the opportunity to review the evidence of vote fraud in Fulton County, which encompasses much of the Atlanta region.

Superior Court Judge Brian Amero said he was inclined to issue the order to unseal the county’s absentee ballots in a case brought by VoterGa co-founder Garland Favorito.

“We want to do this in such a way that dispels rumors and disinformation and sheds light,” Amero said at a hearing Monday, the Atlanta Journal–Constitution reported. “The devil’s in the details.”

Favorito has been tirelessly pressing for probes after witnessing the audacious flipping of Trump and Biden votes during the 2020 election.

His lawsuit in Fulton County alleges that workers at the State Farm Arena recorded fraudulent ballots after having sent home many reporters and poll watchers due to a leaking toilet.

Despite video evidence appearing to corroborate the suspicions, Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger claimed to have investigated and found nothing to support the suspicions.

The footage appeared to show ballot-counters retrieving suitcases from under the table and running the same ballots repeatedly through a tabulation machine.

The secretary of state’s office denied those allegations, insisting that during the hour-long gap with no observers, the ballot-counters were merely engaged in business as usual.

“These are just typical everyday election workers are just doing their jobs,” said Gabriel Sterling, chief operating officer for Raffensperger’s office, according to WSB-TV. “This is not some Ocean’s Eleven-level scheme being put together in the middle of the night.”

But another of Favorito’s lawsuits did lead one Georgia county to acknowledge that the Dominion Voting Systems machines used to tabulate the ballots had automatically weighted them more heavily in favor of Biden.

In December, a forensic audit in Ware County, near the state’s southeastern border with Florida, revealed dozens of Trump ballots switched in Biden’s favor.

Favorito said members of the Establishment from both parties appeared to be working in tandem toward undermining the will of voters.

“In H.R. 1, the Democrats are trying to take control of the country with a bunch of unconstitutional provisions,” Favorito told Politico, referring to the controversial overhaul bill passed by House Democrats that would empower a federal takeover of election administration, effectively securing permanent Democrat majorities.

“In Georgia, the Republicans are trying to solidify their power with certain election provisions in the omnibus bills, which don’t benefit President Trump, and they don’t benefit the people of Georgia, for the most part,” Favorito added.

Georgia’s state legislators have recently put forward a raft of new regulations, ostensibly to guard against efforts by the federal government or activist courts to undermine voting integrity again.

That includes stricter security on absentee ballots and voter-signature requirements.

Already, Georgia activist groups are targeting some of the state’s largest businesses to exert pressure that would prevent the legislators from passing the election-integrity legislation.

Among them companies signaling support for the activists was Atlanta-based Coca-Cola, which recently initiated personnel training that promoted the shocking, racist tenets of so-called critical race theory, including the demand that employees attempt to “be less white.”

Many of the prior security measures were undermined by Raffensperger and Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, both Republicans, when they settled a lawsuit brought by activist Stacey Abrams and backed by national Democrats that loosened the existing standards in February 2020.

Then-President Donald Trump and others sharply criticized the state executives for doing so without legislative approval, a likely violation of the state’s constitution.

Other states’ election officials—most of them from Democrat administrations in states that Trump had won in 2016—took similar actions unilaterally under the auspices of the pandemic, while defying their own GOP-led legislatures.

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