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Friday, January 27, 2023
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Canadian Bill Would Allow Pre-Emptive Reporting of ‘Hate Speech’

'The bill was written to specifically target those who have been deemed to have 'privilege,' and would discriminate against protected classes... '

(Jacob Bruns, Headline USA) A new bill proposed by woke Canadian legislators allows for pre-emptory lawsuits to be filed on the suspicion that someone will someday engage in hate speech, the Citizen Free Press reported.

The long-dead ‘innocent until proven guilty’ standard has now been replaced by ‘guilty until proven innocent.’

According to Bill C-36, all that is required to pursue legal action against potentially hateful opponents is “reasonable grounds,” which, as evidenced over the decades, courts tend to read very broadly.

It says that “a person may, with the Attorney General’s consent, lay an information before a provincial court judge if the person fears on reasonable grounds that another person will commit (a) an offence under section 318 advocating genocide or subsection 319” inciting hate or promoting hatred.

The bill was written to specifically target those who have been deemed to have ‘privilege,’ and would discriminate against protected classes.

It covers “an offence motivated by bias, prejudice or hate based on race, national or ethnic origin, language, color, religion, sex, age, mental or physical disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or any other similar factor.”

The government of Canada’s website claims that the new bill will protect them from mean people while ensuring their dependence on the state.

“Canadians expect to be safe and free from hate speech and hate crimes, online and offline,” they wrote. “The Government of Canada is committed to keeping all Canadians safe, while also protecting their rights and freedoms.”

They also emphasized that this bill is meant to address a real problem, suggesting that internet hate leads to genocide and terrorism.

“Too many people and communities in Canada are harmed and victimized by hate speech, which is often amplified and spread online. Online hate can turn into offline hate with devastating impacts on communities and families.”

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