Quantcast

North Carolina Legislature Passes Bill That Bans Critical Race Theory

'This bill does not change what history can or cannot be taught...It simply prevents schools from endorsing discriminatory concepts...'

(Headline USA) North Carolina Republicans sent a bill Wednesday to the state’s Democratic governor that would strike critical race theory from the curriculum of public schools.

The measure aims to prohibit teachers from compelling their students to personally adopt any of 13 beliefs, including that “An individual, solely by virtue of his or her race or sex, is inherently racist, sexist, or oppressive.”

Republican leaders insist the bill will hold teachers accountable by shedding light on questionable classroom activities.

“This bill does not change what history can or cannot be taught. No spin or innuendo changes that. … It simply prevents schools from endorsing discriminatory concepts,” Rep. John Torbett, a Gaston County Republican, said during a floor debate.

...article continued below
- Advertisement -

Moore’s chamber gave the measure final legislative approval by signing off on changes the Senate made that increase the number of prohibited ideas.

The Senate also clarified that teachers can still discuss those concepts so long as they do not “promote” them and require public school units to inform the Department of Public Instruction and post information on its website upon request a month before providing instruction on the 13 prohibited concepts.

The latest version of the plan passed the Republican-controlled House by a 61-41 vote.

Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper has previously criticized the measure, accusing Republicans of “injecting calculated, conspiracy-laden politics into public education.”

...article continued below
- Advertisement -

Cooper is likely to veto the bill, and Republicans would almost assuredly lack the Democratic votes they’d need to override the governor’s decision.

“Who is doing this? Where are you getting this info? It’s a boogeyman,” said Rep. Abe Jones, D-Wake. “I’d like to see a film or picture of someone standing before a group of students in North Carolina in classrooms and teaching what’s in those 13 parts.”

Still, Lt. Gov Mark Robinson’s task force report did highlight instances of educators accused of giving preferential treatment to pupils who agree with their racial views and teachers offering questionable class assignments.

The assignments included a book called “George” about a transgender child coming to terms with gender identity and a handout that mentions former President Donald Trump in a sentence describing the term “xenophobia.”

Some Republicans associate indoctrination with the promotion of any of 13 views the bill outlines, while other party leaders like the state’s lieutenant governor have a more expansive view of the term and believe the report unquestionably proves systemic failures within the state’s public education system.

Democrats expressed concern Wednesday that the measure could stifle free speech by making educators feel unsafe when describing America’s alleged history of racism and sexism, and ongoing inequities.

“This bill encourages us to look away from our history,” said Rep. Brandon Lofton, D-Mecklenburg.

Adapted from reporting by the Associated Press.

Copyright 2022. No part of this site may be reproduced in whole or in part in any manner without the permission of the copyright owner. To inquire about licensing content, use the contact form at https://headlineusa.com/advertising.
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

TRENDING NOW

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

- Advertisement -