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TOOMEY: Trump Committed ‘Impeachable Offenses’; Could Face ‘Criminal Liability’

'One of the things that I'm concerned about, frankly, is whether the House would completely politicize something...'

Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., became the highest ranking Republican senator on Saturday to publicly support accusations that President Donald Trump committed “impeachable offenses” during the riot at the U.S. Capitol building last week.

House Democrats drafted articles of impeachment against Trump once again, accusing him of “willfully inciting violence” on Jan. 6 when protesters breached the U.S. Capitol building following a pro-Trump rally.

Toomey said he would consider voting to convict Trump if the articles make it to the Senate, but raised concerns about what another politicized impeachment could mean down the road.

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“I don’t know what they are going to send over and one of the things that I’m concerned about, frankly, is whether the House would completely politicize something,” Toomey said. “I do think the president committed impeachable offenses, but I don’t know what’s going to land on the Senate floor if anything.”

The best thing for Trump to do at this point is resign, Toomey added.

“I think at this point, with just a few days left, it’s the best path forward, the best way to get this person in the rear-view mirror for us that could happen immediately,” he continued. “I’m not optimistic it will. But I think that would be the best way forward.”

Even if Trump does resign, though, he could still face “criminal liability,” according to Toomey.

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At least two other Republican senators have vocalized support for Democrats’ impeachment efforts. Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., said he would “consider whatever articles” House Democrats pass, and Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Ala., said Trump has “caused enough damage.”

However, even if the House does send articles of impeachment to the Senate, the senators would not be able to convene for a trial until after Jan. 20, since the Senate is not currently in session.

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