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Vulnerable House Dems Zero-In on Abortion in Lead-Up to Midterms

'It's not going to be what drives everyone to make a vote choice, but it will drive some people to make a vote choice...'

(Headline USA) A Democrat in a Republican state, U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids of Kansas is one of the most vulnerable incumbents seeking reelection this year. In the final months of her congressional campaign, she is focusing on Republicans’ strict opposition to abortion rights.

An online ad she released last week highlights how Amanda Adkins, the Republican favored to emerge from Tuesday’s primary for a rematch with Davids in November, opposed abortion without exceptions.

The ad points to Adkins’ support of an amendment to the Kansas Constitution on the ballot Tuesday that would make clear there is no right to abortion in the states.

“There were a lot of people who would not have known that I have an opponent who is extreme on this issue,” Davids said in an interview. “It’s not hypothetical anymore.”

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Democrats are taking this as a sign of how the Supreme Court’s decision in June to repeal Roe v. Wade has scrambled the political dynamics heading into the fall elections, when control of Congress is at stake. A half-dozen vulnerable House members see the issue as one that could help them win in an otherwise difficult political climate.

In addition to Davids, these incumbents include Reps. Angie Craig of Minnesota, Cindy Axne of Iowa, Elissa Slotkin of Michigan, Abigail Spanberger and Elaine Luria of Virginia, and Susan Wilds of Pennsylvania.

They all face Republican opponents who support the high court’s abortion ruling. Some are contending with rivals who back efforts to ban abortion in all circumstances, including when the mother’s life is at risk.

It’s unclear whether the focus on abortion alone may be enough to mean reelection for many of these Democrats, who are running at a time of high inflation and frustration with President Joe Biden’s performance.

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“In a close, toss-up election, which I think all of these are, it can make a difference,” said national pollster Christine Matthews. “It’s not going to be what drives everyone to make a vote choice, but it will drive some people to make a vote choice.”

Adapted from reporting by the Associated Press.

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