Quantcast
Sunday, April 14, 2024

Colorado Becomes a Sanctuary State for Sexual Deviancy

The main goal of the legislation signed by Democratic Gov. Jared Polis is to ensure people in surrounding states and beyond can go to Colorado to kill their unborn child, block their natural hormones or mutilate their genitals without fear of prosecution

(Headline USA) A trio of health care bills enshrining access to sex-changes, protecting abortion, and restricting pregnancy centers became law in Colorado on Friday as the Democrat-led state tries to make itself a sanctuary state for sexual degenerates in its neighboring states.

The main goal of the legislation signed by Democratic Gov. Jared Polis is to ensure people in surrounding states and beyond can go to Colorado to kill their unborn child, block their natural hormones or mutilate their genitals without fear of prosecution. Bordering states of Wyoming and Oklahoma have passed abortion bans, and Utah has severely restricted transgender care for minors.

Many states with abortion or genital mutilation bans are also criminalizing traveling to states for the purpose of killing their baby or mutilating their body.

The contradicting laws are setting the stage for interstate disputes comparable to the patchwork of same-sex marriage laws that existed until the Supreme Court’s fiat of Obergefell v Hodges.

With the new laws, Colorado joins Illinois as a sanctuary state for sexual deviancy, offering infanticide to residents of conservative states on three sides.

Colorado’s southern neighbor, New Mexico, is also controlled by Democrats and signed a similar abortion protection bill earlier this year. It legally shields those who seek abortions or gender-affirming care, and those who provide the treatments, from interstate investigations.

Visits to Colorado’s abortion clinics have increased by about a third since the overturning of Roe v. Wade, and wait times for an appointment have increased from one or two days up to three weeks, according to state lawmakers. They also expect an increase in wait times for gender mutilation.

Colorado House Minority Leader Mike Lynch said he feared the legislation would make Colorado an abortion destination that will attract “the vulnerable, the indigent and frightened minors from all over the country” and said the package of laws does not protect choice.

“They deny a new mother the choice to consider alternative options other than to end her pregnancy,” Lynch, a Republican from Wellington, said in a statement.

Karen Middleton, president of Cobalt Advocates, a Denver-based organization that pushes for legalized infanticide, said most of the women traveling to Colorado since the Supreme Court ruling have come from Texas and Wyoming. The organization spent $220,000 to help women travel for abortions in Colorado last year, most of them from other states, up from $6,000 in 2021, she said. That is on top of money spent for the actual procedures.

Polis added the first layer of abortion protection a year ago, signing an executive order that bars state agencies from cooperating with out-of-state investigations regarding reproductive healthcare. One of the bills he signed Friday codifies that order into law. Like the New Mexico law, it blocks court summons, subpoenas and search warrants from states that decide to prosecute someone for having an abortion.

Colorado’s abortion law extends the protections to transgender patients dodging restrictions in their own states. The sexual mutilation of children has been available for decades, but some states have recently barred minors from accessing it, even with parental consent.

Conservative states are pushing back. Idaho passed a bill that outlaws providing a minor with abortion pills and helping them leave the state to terminate a pregnancy without their parents’ consent.

Also on Friday, Polis signed a measure that outlaws “deceptive practices” by anti-abortion centers, which are known to suggest alternatives to infanticide. The bill also prohibits sites from offering what’s called an abortion pill reversal.

Another bill signed Friday requires large employers to offer coverage for the total cost of an abortion, with an exception for those who object on religious grounds. It exempts public employees because Colorado’s constitution forbids the use of public funds for abortions.

Adapted from reporting by the Associated Press

Copyright 2024. No part of this site may be reproduced in whole or in part in any manner other than RSS without the permission of the copyright owner. Distribution via RSS is subject to our RSS Terms of Service and is strictly enforced. To inquire about licensing our content, use the contact form at https://headlineusa.com/advertising.
- Advertisement -

TRENDING NOW

TRENDING NOW